TUP Wrestling Forum Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Wrestling > Old School Wrestling
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - WCW Australia (1964 - 1978).
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

WCW Australia (1964 - 1978).

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <12
Author
Message
thundarr2000 View Drop Down
Hall of Famer
Hall of Famer
Avatar

Joined: 13/June/2007
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 15267
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote thundarr2000 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01/January/2012 at 19:07
Can't forget that Ox Baker appeared in Escape from New York starring Kurt Russell.  Big smile
 
"Playboy" Gary Hart is not related to "Colonel" Jimmy Hart.  And neither of them is related to Stu Hart's family in Canada.  Nor are any of them related to Bobby Hart, a wrestler on Oz's list. 
 
Bobby Hart was active from 1961 - 1975.  He mostly worked tag teams, and also worked masked.  Bobby Hart may have been wrestling's first masked man called The Patriot.  An American themed character, portrayed by a Canadian.
 
 
 
Yeah, there's a lot of Harts in wrestling. 
Back to Top
EdgeHead View Drop Down
PB Members
PB Members
Avatar

Joined: 22/November/2006
Location: Quebec, Canada
Status: Offline
Points: 3512
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote EdgeHead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03/January/2012 at 05:31
Originally posted by thundarr2000 thundarr2000 wrote:

"Playboy" Gary Hart was a wrestler thru the mid 1960's into the late 1970's.  He worked mostly in tag teams.  But he traveled between many promotions during his day.  Including Australia.
 
Most fans in the US remember him as a manager.  By the end of the 1970's, Gary Hart had retired as a wrestling was a big-time manager in several promotions.  He was in World Class for a long time and was even head booker.  He was also a part of NWA-Mid Atlantic & NWA-Georgia.  He's widely remembered for his run in Jim Crocket Productions' NWA promotion.  It was in JCP that Hart managed the Great Muta, Terry Funk and others.
 
Hart spent the 1990's bouncing around different Texas promotions.  He was a part of the short-lived Global Wrestling Federation.  But most of these companies never lasted very long.  Hart official retired in 1999.
 
Hart made a brief return in 2004 to help a small company.  He only worked 2 shows, then company closed.  But for those 2 shows, Gary Hart managed Homicide & Low-Ki.  Hart died in 2008 at age 66.
 
His wikipedia page lists 45 wrestlers that Hart managed.  But that list isn't considered to be complete.


I remember reading that WWE wanted to bring in Gary Hart to manage Umaga shortly before his death. Man, would he have fit the part to a tee!
Back to Top
ozwwefan View Drop Down
PB Members
PB Members
Avatar

Joined: 06/March/2010
Location: OZ
Status: Offline
Points: 2784
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ozwwefan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03/January/2012 at 14:32
          Thanks Thun, I have trouble keeping track of Harts lol.
          Bobby Hart came out here a couple of times, Tag Teaming with Australian Larry O'Dea (or O'Day) for the NWA Austra-Asian Tag Team Titles. They won the tag title twice, in 1975 and again in 1978. O'Dea won the title 2 other times between those dates with different partners (Wiskoski 1976, Ron Miller 1977), so Bobby wasn't around between titles. Here's a pic of Larry O'Dea. 
 
                                    
 
           O'Dea and his long time mate Ron Miller toured the southern US in the early 1970's as 'The Australians', winning the NWA Florida Tag Team Championship 4 times between August 1971 and March 1972, and then NWA Tennessee Tag Team Championship about a month later. O'Dea became a co-owner of WCW in 1975.
 
                                    
 
                                                Some gimmicks are just wrong lol.


Edited by ozwwefan - 03/January/2012 at 14:38
                             &n
Back to Top
thundarr2000 View Drop Down
Hall of Famer
Hall of Famer
Avatar

Joined: 13/June/2007
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 15267
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote thundarr2000 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03/January/2012 at 18:20
Originally posted by ozwwefan ozwwefan wrote:

  
 
 
                                    
 
                                                Some gimmicks are just wrong lol.
 
What do you mean?  Don't all Australians wear those hats?
 
LOLLOLLOLLOLLOL
Back to Top
ozwwefan View Drop Down
PB Members
PB Members
Avatar

Joined: 06/March/2010
Location: OZ
Status: Offline
Points: 2784
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ozwwefan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04/January/2012 at 05:08
         Yeah Thun, especially when we were being shot at by Turks, Germans, Japanese, North Koreans/Chinese, and North Vietmanese LOL. 'Slouch hats' are kind of a national icon reserved for former or serving military personal, one reason advertisers steer clear of using it, and you'll rarely (if ever) see a civilian wearing one.
         Generally, Australians shy away from any kind of overt nationalist jingoism, and about the only time it gets used these days is by sports people and anyone with a product to sell. Oh, and by the white supremicist mob too lol.
        
         I was just reading a bio by Ron Miller on the KPW (Kiwi Pro Wrestling) site which gives a neat insight into the links between wrestling promotions in the US, Australia, New Zealand, and Japan during the 60s and 70s.
 
        "I teamed with Larry O'Day in 1971 and toured the USA for two years as the Australians. As promoters of WCW during the 60s-70s, Larry and I were members of the NWA which at that time comprised 32 promotions worldwide. During that time we had dealings with most of them, however the main ones we exchanged wrestling talent and TV footage with, were - Shohei Baba (Japan) - Eddie Graham (Florida) - Vince McMahon Snr. (New York) - Jim Crockett (Charlotte) and Steve Rickard (New Zealand)." Miller became a co-owner of WCW with O'Dea.
         On the same site a US wrestler 'The Destroyer' (Dick Beyer) also talks about the pay rates at the time - 
        "The worst memory was being cancelled in Australia . While I was in Hawaii Jim Barnett cancelled my trip - I was going to make $750.00 a week in Australia. Instead I stayed in New Zealand and with promoter Steve Rickard I worked for 3 months and I averaged $1500.00 a week and I stayed in Orewa on the beach and my kids still talk about that experience."
         Pretty decent pay-rates for the mid to late 1960s. Obviously we never got to see the Destroyer here, does anyone know how big he was in the US? He started the Destroyer mask gimmick in 1963, and also wrestled as Doctor X.
 
                               
              
        
 
           
       
              
                             &n
Back to Top
thundarr2000 View Drop Down
Hall of Famer
Hall of Famer
Avatar

Joined: 13/June/2007
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 15267
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote thundarr2000 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04/January/2012 at 21:41
I know that as Dr. X, he worked in AWA for a long while.  Outside of the AWA, he was the Destroyer.  Vern Gagne would occassionally bill guys under different names for various reasons.
 
Dr. X was AWA World Heavyweight Champion once, but only for 2 weeks.  Back then being champ for 2 weeks was like being champ for an hour is now.  As the Destroyer he worked all over, and was WWA World Champion 3 times.
 
He retired before I got into wrestling.  But I understand that he lost his mask repeatedly.  He would lose his mask in one city, and then a few weeks later he would do the whole thing over in a different city.  In days before VHS tapes or the Internet, they could do stuff like that.  He wasn't the only one that did that bit either.


Edited by thundarr2000 - 04/January/2012 at 21:41
Back to Top
thundarr2000 View Drop Down
Hall of Famer
Hall of Famer
Avatar

Joined: 13/June/2007
Location: United States
Status: Offline
Points: 15267
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote thundarr2000 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06/January/2012 at 05:43
I just had to add this video to this thread. 
 
 
It's from 1969.  Great quality for the time.  Killer Karl Kox and the Spoiler were being managed by "Playboy" Gary Hart.
Back to Top
ozwwefan View Drop Down
PB Members
PB Members
Avatar

Joined: 06/March/2010
Location: OZ
Status: Offline
Points: 2784
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ozwwefan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06/January/2012 at 12:36
         That vid is pretty funny Thundaar. The guy getting done over throughout the match is Antonio Pugliese (Tony Parisi), and his pal on the outside helping the heels is the 6' 5" Mario Milano.
         At the time Pugliese was working for the WWWF in the states, and during a trip out to Australia in early 1968, had teamed with Milano to become the local IWA tag champs.     
         Milano was an Italian who lived, trained, and wrestled in the US before Barnett brought him to Australia to work. Milano liked Australia so much that he decided to move here, and by the 70s we pretty much considered him to be a local.
         In those days, the local talent generally played the faces against touring heels who were usually recognizable by their over-the-top gimmicks. Pugliese and Milano generally played faces, and  had beaten uber-heels Skull Murphy and Brute Bernard (crowd favourites who visited often) for the titles in April 1968. Because Milano was generally a face, I imagine their would have been a wow factor for the swerve he takes in the vid to help the heels.
         This vid must have been shot in early 1969, as Milano and The Spoiler went on to defeat Pugliese and Don Leo Jonathan for the IWA tag titles in March of that year. The inference here is that Hart was one smooth talking but sneaky dude to convince Milano to swerve on his old tag partner lol. Love the shades Cool
                             &n
Back to Top
ozwwefan View Drop Down
PB Members
PB Members
Avatar

Joined: 06/March/2010
Location: OZ
Status: Offline
Points: 2784
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ozwwefan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13/January/2012 at 06:44
                                                      'THE FABULOUS KANGAROOS'.
        
                                                  
                                                    Al Costello, Roy Heffernan, and manager
                                                    Ralph 'Wild Red' Berry.
 
       The Fabulous Kangaroos were the brainchild of Al Costello, an Italian Australian who'd debuted as a wrestler in 1938. Although Costello enjoyed success locally, in 1952 he headed to America in the hope of making a name for himself. In those days wrestlers had to learn how to be pro in the US before bookers would push them up the card (= more $). 
       Costello didn't get far as a solo performer, and had been mulling over the idea of forming an 'Ultra-Australian' tag team. While touring Hawaii in 1956, he mentioned this idea to fellow wrestler Joe Blanchard, a friend of Roy Heffernan, who suggested they hook up. At the time Heffernan was working for Stu Hart's Stampede Wrestling in Canada, who'd travelled to America in 1953 in the hope of finding greater success like Costello had. 
        Costello and Heffernan formed a tag team, and the 'Fabulous Kangaroos' debuted in May 1957 for the Stampede Wrestling promotion. Their Ultra-Australian gimmick included the use of slouch hats (like 'The Australians'), boomerangs, and 'Waltzing Matilda' as their entrance music. In no time they were wrestling the top tag teams in Canada and started travelling across the border to the US to perform, and due to their ability to get fans riled by their heel antics, began headlining shows wherever they performed (more on this later).   
         The Fabulous Kangaroos soon aquired a manager, 'Wild Red' Berry, who'd debuted in 1926. Berry was 'a showman of the first order' who quickly earned a reputation for his 'wild' antics, and generally played the heel. The 5' 8" Berry earned a stack of titles while wrestling, but was best known for his ability as a speaker and badmouth. As Frankie Cain explained... 
        "He'd go out there and build up a head of steam just as soon as he could, and start fighting with the people. He never shut up. I mean, he'd talk to the people from the beginning of that match to the end of that match, always raising hell with them." 
         Berry, the ultimate wordsmith, described his verballing tactics like this...
        "My strategy is that of compelling them to proceed from a state of bewilderment and complete uncertainty to a disturbing sense of inferiority, putting them thus in awkward, perplexing, and vexatious situations on the horns of a dilemma. This is possible through my great depth of intellect, integrity, heroic boldness, leonine courage, scholarly mien, and alert perception."
         Or, "Let these hams primp their feathers and strut their plumes," [Berry] bellowed in 1954. "I will proceed to maltreat and obliterate them. I will turn loose such terrific voltage and velocity and elliptical trajectory that when it lands on the cleft of the chin it will tear loose their medulla oblongata from the pericranium, cure them of chronic dandruff and knock out four of their impacted wisdom teeth." (lmao).
         Costello offered Berry the role of manager in 1958 after hearing him speak on radio from an event in Texas, and until the Fabulous Kangaroos disbanded in 1965, the trio's heel act tore the house down wherever they performed. Here's a few examples...
        'On one occasion in August 1958 the Kangaroos, or "Kangaroo Men" as they were billed, nearly caused a riot in Madison Square Garden during a match against Antonino Rocca and Miguel Perez. The fans began to throw fruit and stones after the match ended without a decisive winner, and the promoters had to step in, turn up the lights in the arena and play the National Anthem to stop a potential riot from breaking out.' (Roy Heffernan wiki).     
         'During one infamous match in Winnipeg, The Kangaroos made Stan Stasiak an "honorary Kangaroo" for the night (complete with bush hat and all) for a six-man tag team match against Jonathan, McClarty and Karl Gotch. During the match The Kangaroos' cheating tactics aggravated the crowd so much that the fans threw chairs at the team. The Kangaroos attempted to hide under the ring to escape the flying chairs, but rabid fans tried to light the ring apron on fire to "smoke out" The Kangaroos.' (Fabulous Kangaroos wiki).
         In this vid you get to see the Kangaroos go heel on the black team of Sweet Daddy Siki and 'Sailor' Art Thomas...                           
 
 
         After Heffernan left, Costello continued to create new 'Kangaroos' teams with other partners, but it was his pairing with Heffernan that had the greatest impact upon the world of pro-wrestling, not only in the huge number of titles they accumulated but also in the way tag teams operated after them. In 2003 Costello and Heffernan were the first tag team to be inducted into the Pro-Wrestling Hall Of Fame, being considered one of the best tag teams in history.
         'In fact, many people in the past held the mistaken belief that The Fabulous Kangaroos invented tag team wrestling, which was not true since tag team wrestling had been seen as early as 1936. The reason for this belief lies in the fact that The Kangaroos were one of the first teams to popularize tag team wrestling, and because tag teaming was often referred to as "Australian rules" or "Australian tag team".
         'The Kangaroos themselves were not slow to play off this belief, often claiming (kayfabe) that they were such a well coordinated tag team because "Amateur team wrestling was very popular in Australia".
         'The term "Australian rules" had been coined long before 1957 debut of The Kangaroos. Records indicate that tag team wrestling was already being referred to as "Australian rules" already in the mid 1940s. The Fabulous Kangaroos were among the first people in wrestling to play up the sports entertainment elements in professional wrestling.' (Fabulous Kangaroos wiki). 
          For more on Red Berry, this is the best site...
 
         Guess that means Kingston and Bourne are the current holders of the 'Australian Rules' title lol.
 
       


Edited by ozwwefan - 13/January/2012 at 12:32
                             &n
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <12
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 11.01
Copyright ©2001-2014 Web Wiz Ltd.

This page was generated in 0.078 seconds.