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The Curious Case of Alberto Rodriguez

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ihatethatmonkee View Drop Down
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    Posted: 08/August/2014 at 21:52
It should have been so easy. Coming from a family of wrestlers, Alberto Rodriguez should have had an easier path to, and in, the WWE.

Signing with the WWE back in 2009, Rodriguez spent a year in Florida Championship Wrestling, despite not wanting to, which he later admitted taught him a lot, before being called up to the main roster as the Mexican Aristocrat, Alberto Del Rio. Making his ring entrance in expensive cars each week to sell the gimmick, he debuted on the 20 August 2010 Smackdown, defeating Rey Mysterio.

The build for Del Rio was more about his gimmick, and his finishing move, the cross-arm breaker submission. He moved on from injuring Mysterio, to being used to “injure” Matt Hardy in his farewell match, before doing the same to Christian. Upon Mysterios return, their feud picked up, with Del Rio costing the Smackdown team by attacking team-mate Mysterio at the Bragging Rights event, which led to a traditional five-on-five match at the next months’ Survivor Series Pay-Per-View.
While Team Del Rio lost to Team Mysterio, Del Rio himself was not pinned, but knocked out by the Big Show’s WMD finisher. A brief detour into sporadically booked King of the Ring tournament saw the feud continue in Del Rio’s first title shot match, a fatal four-way at TLC that also involved then World Heavyweight Champion Kane and eventual winner Edge. His first feature feud ended in the first week of 2011 in a two-out-of-three falls match at a Smackdown taping.

His first major feud over, the big push for him started with him winning the 2011 Royal Rumble match, going on to challenge Edge for the World Heavyweight Championship at WrestleMania 27.

If anything, this is actually where things started to go wrong for Del Rio. In promos, he had been telling the audience for some time that it was his destiny to be champion. While the push for the title match at WrestleMania was pretty well planned, and his lost to Edge at the event was the right booking, events that followed seemed to accelerate a drive to put the belt on Del Rio, rather than allowing him to gain more heel heat.

Edges retirement may or may not have changed the plans for what was supposed to happen at Extreme Rules. As Christian came out of the ladder match for the vacant World Heavyweight Championship the victor, it seems unlikely that the original plan was for Edge to drop the title to Del Rio. Del Rio was already on his way out of Smackdown anyway, as the annual Draft – that had come about earlier due to Edge having to retire – saw him moved to Raw. This was perhaps a mistake; Edge retiring and Del Rio and Christian fighting over a vacant title should have allowed a three month/event programme between the two, before Christian eventually dropped the title to Orton and turned heel.
Similar to the direction WWE finally took with Bastista, Del Rio at that time should have been chasing the title, looking like a threat to the champion, but not quite having the last piece of the puzzle needed to actually win the big one.

In any case, the move to Raw meant he was out of the WWE Championship picture for some time. This could have affected the momentum he had coming out of Extreme Rules. The ensuing feud with Big Show showed there had been no immediate plans for him. The match at the June PPV, Capitol Punishment, was a non-event, since the feud with Big Show was only there to further a feud between Show and a returning Mark Henry, who gifted the victory to Del Rio on the night by attacking Show before the match to the point that, while the match did get started, it was stopped by the referee. For the second time in less than a year, Del Rio ended a feud with a televised match, and again with help from Mark Henry.

While the tactic of a heel winning dirty is a tried and tested formula to gain heat, Henry really didn’t need to be involved. Since he came up to the main roster, Del Rio had his own personal ring announcer, Ricardo Rodriguez, who was used to cause the distractions when such a dirty win was needed. For a brief period at the start of 2011, up until he was drafted to Raw, Del Rio also utilised rookie Brodus Clay as a bodyguard, so he had ample help to gain a cheap win, and get the heel heat that his character needed, but still wasn’t fully getting. Henry costing Show the wins in these matches put the heat firmly on Henry, with Del Rio not even getting secondary heat.

His win at the Money in The Bank event in July at least went some way to get him some credible heat. Properly utilised that night, his briefcase was nearly immediately cashed in during the PPVs main event, pitting WWE Champion John Cena against an out-the-door CM Punk. Punks’ contract had expired that night, and he had promised that he would win the title and walk away with it from the WWE. He did win, after Cena was distracted by Vince McMahon and Head of Talent Relations John Laurinaitis, and immediately after the bell, Del Rio came running out with his briefcase at McMahons’ behest. Punk managed to duck away and left through the crowd, which was the best thing that could happen for Del Rio at that time.

However, the next night on Raw, McMahon immediately announced a new WWE Championship belt was ready, and that a tournament would take place that night to crown a new champion.

One of the WWE’s big problems other than the stop/start pushes of talent is the inconsistencies. While it may not be possible to remember what happened 12 months previous and bring that into play, McMahon had been stressing the importance of Cena retaining the title since Cena pushed for the match with Punk a couple of weeks prior to the PPV. One week after his last statement about how the WWE needed the WWE Championship to stay in the company, we already had a new title belt made up, and McMahon was the man announcing that the company were moving on as if nothing had happened.

One clever ploy this had the potential to allow was that Del Rio was one of the eight men named in the tournament, so theoretically, could have won the WWE Championship, and retained the briefcase for the entire year. That would either have allowed him to skip a challenger, or have an extra chance should he have lost the title prior to the briefcases expiration date of July 2012. While it would still have been too early, in this writers’ opinion, for Del Rio to have held any of the top championships at that time, Del Rio being in the final, with another chance to win a top title, could have added another layer of drama to proceedings. Sadly, Del Rio didn’t make it to the final, which was won by Mysterio over The Miz.

What he did get, though, was the chance to cash in the briefcase at Summer Slam after Punk was victorious over Cena. An easy way to attract heat since the inception of the gimmick, even here, Del Rio wasn’t allowed to gain the heat. Between the match ending with Punk pinning Cena, and Del Rio handing his briefcase to the referee to signal the cash-in and beginning of his match, Punk was taken out by Kevin Nash with the big boot. Del Rio had won the title, but the boos were not directed at him, they were directed at Nash and special Referee HHH.

The next big problem was about to occur. Despite the fact that Del Rio had pinned Punk, the title feud was between him and John Cena. Punk was moved into a feud with Nash that simply never paid off, and Cena went straight into demanding his title rematch. He got it, and beat Del Rio just over a month into his first title reign at the next month’s PPV, Night of Champions. While he regained the title for his second and last run with the WWE Championship at the very next month’s PPV, Hell in a Cell, once again, the heel heat was taken away from him. R-Truth and The Miz had recently been fired, and used the Hell in a Cell match to hide under the ring, then come out at the conclusion and attack all three participants, and Ricardo Rodriguez.

Del Rio’s title win was forgotten to further a different angle that was not going to involve him. In the rematch at Vengeance against Cena, he won, but again with interference from The Miz and R-Truth. His lacklustre run ended the following month against Punk at Survivor Series, and while he was involved in multiple title matches between then and his torn groin injury in December, he never even came close to being a threat to what would become the longest reign of the WWE Championship in the modern era by Punk.

Upon his return in February 2012, Del Rio set his sights on the World Heavyweight Championship again, now held by Sheamus. Sadly, he was unable to return to in-ring action until after that year’s WrestleMania, meaning he missed on the a big money day there, either as part of the Team Laurinaitis versus Team Teddy angle, or against Sheamus for the title, and didn’t return full time until April 2. Bearing in mind how long vignettes had ran for him before he first appeared in the WWE, during this lengthy hiatus, he only appeared twice from December to April; on a house she in February where he arm wrestled Sheamus, and during the Elimination Chamber event to show his support for John Laurinaitis. If it hadn’t been obvious before, it was perhaps noticeable now that the higher-ups had cooled on Del Rio as a viable headliner heel. Just over two weeks after his return, he was officially moved from Raw to Smackdown, and began his program with Sheamus.

Again, fate was not looking kindly on the Mexican Aristocrat, as he failed to beat Sheamus during a fatal four-way match at May’s Over The Limit event, then suffered a concussion at a Smackdown taping at the beginning of June that saw him pulled from the planned title match with Sheamus at No Way Out. Once he was cleared to wrestle again, he faced Dolph Ziggler in a contract on a pole match on Raw that went to a non-finish. As a result, both men were put in for a title match four days later on Smackdown. While Del Rio didn’t win, he also didn’t eat the pinfall, which should have been a starting point for him to be rebuilt. He was given a title shot at Sheamus in a singles match at July’s Money in the Bank PPV, which he lost, and the feud with Sheamus was put on hold.

On the next night’s Raw, something that WWE should have done a long time before happened. Del Rio was frustrated at not being able to win the night before, and was looking for someone to take that out on. On finding regular punch-bag Zack Ryder, he started to beat down the still slightly over jobber, and that should have been used as a start point to turn Del Rio into a madman, not being able to take just missing out on getting the title he felt was his. Again, though, WWE higher-ups didn’t want this to happen, so the beat-down was interrupted by a returning Mysterio. Another chance to give the Del Rio character momentum was scuppered before it could even have gained traction.
While in the end, Del Rio overcame Mysterio, as well as Daniel Bryan and Kane, to win another number one contender match, a bizarre storyline meant that the match very nearly didn’t take place at Summer Slam. During a Raw segment, Sheamus was shown taking the car Del Rio had driven to the arena, and going for a joyride, bringing the car back in a very damaged condition. The match was moved to Smackdown on August 10, where Del Rio came out with a police escort, threatening to press charges against Sheamus, before revealing that the police were not real, and attacking Sheamus. This lead to Smackdown General Manager revoking Del Rio’s contendership, though Sheamus got the match put back on just three days before the PPV.

It was overly complicated, and in the PG age of WWE television, potentially confusing to its younger viewers. Sheamus was shown to have committed a crime, by stealing a car, and then joyriding, as well as damaging the car. While these incidents were done in what was to be a comical way, it showed that Del Rio didn’t have the upper hand over Sheamus in any way. Sheamus was even outdoing him in heelish behaviour, and getting away with it.

Even worse for Del Rio, he didn’t even win the Summer Slam match. And, seemingly as if his latest gimmick was of a heel who couldn’t catch a break, he lost by pinfall when his feet were clearly under the ropes.
Even so, he had to earn another title shot, and did so by defeating Randy Orton on the following Smackdown. Another overly complicated story was to follow to lead-in to the Night of Champions PPV. Del Rio filed assault charges against Sheamus after he and Rodriguez were attack at the previous Raw taping. Booker T then stipulated that, while an investigation was going on into that, Sheamus’ Brogue Kick was banned, and that Sheamus would be stripped of the title if he used it again. While this seemed to work in Del Rio’s favour, with several instances of baiting to try and get Sheamus to use the move, before the match actually began at the PPV, Booker appeared at the top of the ramp to announce that he had finished his investigation, and that the Brogue Kick was now no longer banned.

While Del Rio would not have been scheduled to win the title that night anyway, allowing the ban on the Brogue Kick to stay in place would have done something that had been missing from other Del Rio title matches; it would have at least made the result a bit less certain before the match began. Once the ban was lifted, the tension was gone, and the result was a forgone conclusion, as Sheamus got the win using the Brogue Kick.

Out of the title picture again, Del Rio moved on to what could laughably be called a few with Randy Orton. They had five matches, three singles, one 6-man tag, and one traditional Survivor Series elimination ten-man tag. Del Rio could only be said to have won one of those matches, as he was on Team Ziggler’s side, who won out over Team Foley, of whom Orton was a member. However, even there, Del Rio, as in every other match, ate the pin and Orton was the guy to cover him in every instance. He was already slipping rapidly from fringe main eventer, to jobber to the elite players.

In December, 2012, Del Rio was turned face. This was partly to try and see if he could get over, as it was believed he had failed to do so as a heel. While, of course, the performer has to take some of the blame for not connecting with the audience, whether it be to get them to cheer or boo, it is very clear that every chance Del Rio should have been given to help himself get over was taken from him. While his first – and, at this point, only – face run will be remembered for him defeating Big Show for his first World Heavyweight Championship reign, it was booked in such a way that, had he still been heel, he would at least have gotten more heat than he ever did during the actual heel run.

Del Rio won the title on the January 11, 2013 Smackdown. The episode had been taped on January 8, as was usual; however, what was not was that WWE.com saw fit to put the win on its front page, again ruining any momentum or surprise. It was in a Last Man Standing match, which was the stipulation that was used for the rematch at that years Royal Rumble. This time, he won using a heel tactic, but one that had already been used by a face before. Shows ankles were duct taped together around one of the ring posts to stop Show from answering the count of ten, an ending that had been used by John Cena against Batista at Extreme Rules in 2010. While Cena was able to get away with such a finish due to his splitting of the audience, the short lived pop for Del Rio and Rodriguez rendition of it did more harm to his face push than good.

Del Rio remained World Heavyweight Champion until after WrestleMania, losing it the night after on Raw when Ziggler cashed in his Money in the Bank briefcase on an injured, but victorious, Del Rio, who had just face Jack Swagger, and manager Zeb Colter, in a handicap match. Once again chasing the title, Del Rio and Swagger were due to face off against Ziggler at Extreme Rules in a triple threat match for the title, but the match was changed to an I quit match to determine the number one contender after Ziggler suffered a severe concussion at a Smackdown taping that ruled him out of the PPV.

The title match took place at June’s Payback PPV, and was used to turn Del Rio heel. While the strategy to do so was sound – Del Rio targeted Zigglers head to take advantage of his previous concussion – many felt that turning him face so briefly had been a waste of time. While Del Rio was over as a hometown hero in Mexico, he had failed to get over when fighting Swagger, who had a nationalist gimmick at the time. It appeared that it would have been better for Del Rio to stay heel, since his face run had barely lasted half a year. While the run had led to both World Heavyweight Championship runs, he was no further up the roster ladder than when he had moved from Raw to Smackdown over a year before.

Del Rio won out his feud with Ziggler, and feuds with Christian and Rob Van Dam followed. He again came out on top of these, making this last reign his best and most consistent. Del Rios next opponent was announced as John Cena. As with his previous Cena feud, for many people, it was a forgone conclusion that Cena was going to lift the World Heavyweight Championship at Hell in a Cell. Cena did, and Del Rio’s reign is logged as 133 days, the seventh longest reign of the titles WWE use. He lost the rematch at Survivor Series, and that was the last time he would hold the gold.

Del Rio started a feud with a returning Sin Cara in December that continued until Del Rio won on the January 6, 2014 Raw. After the match, Del Rio cut a promo on the soon to return Batista. He claimed he would eliminate Batista at the upcoming Royal Rumble.   That he gave the reason it was to get “everyone talking about me” was perhaps the truest thing he had been scripted to say. At the time, no one was talking about Del Rio. Even more so after these promos, since it became obvious that Del Rio was going to be sacrificed to Batista upon his physical return to gain a face pop. Defeating Mysterio the next week, Del Rio cut another promo, and started another after beating Mysterio again on the January 20 Raw, where Batista did make his return, and got his pop by performing the Batista bomb on Del Rio. In the Rumble match itself, Del Rio did perform well, but was eliminated by Batista. It was again another mistake; any heel winning the Rumble – or potentially any bar Daniel Bryan – would have received super heat. Batista himself had already started being booed by fans, despite supposedly being a face, due to the fans knowing he was going to win the Rumble before the PPV was even on. So much heat that it required him to turn face shortly before his WrestleMania match. That heat would have been best served for an up and comer, or a person who was at any time a fringe main eventer who could do with the hate. As it was, WWE higher ups were reluctant to change their plans, expecting the fans to accept what they were being fed. This did not happen.

Del Rio had one final shot at the gold. He qualified for the Money in the Bank match, which then became for the vacant Undisputed WWE Championship – the World Heavyweight and WWE Championships had been unified at the TLC PPV in December 2013 – after champion Daniel Bryans’ neck injury required more time off than previously thought. He lost out to Cena, yet again.

Three further title shots took up Del Rio’s final months. He tried, and failed, twice to get the United States Championship from Sheamus, and was eliminated from a battle royal for the vacant Intercontinental Title – Bad News Barrett had been stripped of the title after being injured by Jack Swagger at a Smackdown taping almost a month before – by Ziggler, who was eliminated last by The Miz.

On August 4, he faced Dean Ambrose on Raw in a beat the clock challenge match, and lost at just under 16 minutes. While it was a competitive match, he was now just a glorified jobber, in no feud or angle of consequence. His last WWE match was a loss to Swagger for WWE Main Event, on August 5. Two days later, WWE announced he had been released after an altercation with a backstage WWE employee.

Del Rio could have been much bigger than WWE ever allowed him to be. He came in to the company with not only a history of wrestling, both professional and amateur, but also a fairly impressive MMA record of 9/5. Seven of those wins had come by submission, something that was seemingly ever only built up until he faced Cena, so that it could be used to try and make the face of WWE the underdog, and for him to overcome as easily as a flick to the ear. That he has been fired for an altercation with an employee, when other, lower carded performers have been able to stay, despite putting a female in a chokehold to get her to come back to his hotel room, shows that, while the Wellness policy has been somewhat of a success for the WWE, it still has a problem with its priorities.

Of course, for the past five years, no one will have seen then more than Alberto Rodriguez.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Rico Len Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/August/2014 at 01:40
I "liked" this simply based on the amount of effort alone.

Del Rio was always a very good hand in the ring, and was obviously charismatic, however despite being charismatic and a great worker he never really developed an on screen personality that connected well with the fans either as a face or a heel.

I am disappointed that nothing came of Del Rio and Batista, as their respective MMA backgrounds could have made for a very entertaining storyline were they to work a program, however that 'program' (if you want to call it that) was half-assed and fell flat as a result.

IMO he is a man who never reached his full potential. I hope in years to come the younger fanbase will look on him in much the same way I look at guys like Hacksaw Jim Duggan, Million Dollar Man and other guys that were midcard while I was little. Granted ADR is a former WWE Champion so he ought to be held in even higher esteem, but I myself have a hard time looking him at much more successful than Hacksaw. And hey, I loved Hacksaw! That's not a slap in the face to ADR, it's just that Hacksaw was no WWF champion either.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Raven Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/August/2014 at 03:40
I look at him the same way I look at Hacksaw. They're both shitty and annoying.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote John The Baptist Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/August/2014 at 10:09
Originally posted by Rico Len Rico Len wrote:


I am disappointed that nothing came of Del Rio and Batista, as their respective MMA backgrounds could have made for a very entertaining storyline were they to work a program, however that 'program' (if you want to call it that) was half-assed and fell flat as a result.




They had two fights between them, 1 win & 1 loss, hardly a thing to build a feud around.

Sorry Monkee but I couldnt read half of that just because Del Rio wasnt interesting enough for a career retrospect, although he was a top 3 wrestler in the company in ring, only Orton is slicker IMO.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ihatethatmonkee Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/August/2014 at 13:05
it was weird doing the research for this.

as I state in the article, I found that every opportunity to really build heat for him was given to someone else, either to fuel a feud that was going on outside of the match with ADR, or to start one with his opponent.

the match with Big Show is a prime example. if ADR had been heel then, I seriously doubt that finish would have been used, or if it were, it would have been done by any other performer bar Rodriguez and ADR.

his face run, to me, was flat. while the turn had nothing to do with Swagger's programme on screen, I can only believe that was the only reason for turning him during the 3MB segment, since otherwise, there were no top, non-domestic stars for Swagger to feud with.

with how he came into the company, with promises of keeping the Dos Cara name, the mask, et al, and only having any of them for the briefest of times in FCW, it's a surprise he lasted this long. those promises were broken by WWE as quickly as they were made, and he just went along with it.

obviously not to say he's a complete victim; his ego when he first was signed was probably justification enough to have sent him to FCW. I still think WWE missed a trick by not having all the Hispanic talent form a faction, only speak promos in Spanish, and at least then allow Mistico's Sin Cara to have a voice, as he would surely be allowed to speak his native tongue. I maintain that such a faction could have had the potential to cause the same kind of heel/face grey area that the Hart Foundation did in the 90s. bringing in Rey Mysterio could have allowed a brief heel run for him until he got a title shot ahead of ADR, allowing even more heat for ADR, but its all moot now.

I also maintain that he should never have gotten any of the titles he did, that he should have been built up as not quite being able to finish the job, and potentially have been the guy who did finish the Taker's WrestleMania streak, since it's obvious now that the plan was never to let a younger, up and coming talent have that job. that would have at least allowed him to again be a massive heel, and been the catalyst for him to then win the title, preferably over Cena, and certainly cleanly.

le sigh.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rico Len Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/August/2014 at 19:09
Originally posted by John The Baptist John The Baptist wrote:

Originally posted by Rico Len Rico Len wrote:


I am disappointed that nothing came of Del Rio and Batista, as their respective MMA backgrounds could have made for a very entertaining storyline were they to work a program, however that 'program' (if you want to call it that) was half-assed and fell flat as a result.




They had two fights between them, 1 win & 1 loss, hardly a thing to build a feud around.


That's exactly my point! It was a complete and total dud, and yet it easily could have been so much more. They half-assed it between the two, and so no one gives a shit about their "feud" (if you even want to call it that) but if it had received even a little bit more attention by the creative team it could have been pretty cool.

And no, I'm not saying it was going to be a blockbuster feud either, but there's no reason it should have been completely blah.

They never once mentioned their MMA histories, not even on commentary. But had ADR brought it up, and Batista responded, and they built the feud around their respective MMA records it could have been pretty cool.

Edited by Rico Len - 09/August/2014 at 19:10
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ihatethatmonkee Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/August/2014 at 19:25
erm, no.

look, Dave had one fight, just one, against someone who was not in the best shape.

Rodriguez had 14, and won 9, hardly anything to compare. Bautista is nothing compared to him, and to give that travesty of a "fight" any exposure would be a crime to the eyes of anything forced to view it.

he didn't need a feud with Dave at all, he needed to be consistently booked as a heel, and that never happened. there were flashes in the feud with Sheamus, but they then over complicated it.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HBKDX97 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/August/2014 at 19:28
I saw him wrestle at a house show when he was "Dos Caras Jr." It was in Huntsville, AL so his Mexican masked gimmick should have drawn the obvious racist heat. But even cutting a heel promo in English and Spanish, he got near silence.

He was smooth in the ring, but someone try to name one memorable spot in any of his matches that would make it on a "Best of" list. Shawn Michaels has the splash off the top of a ladder, Hogan slammed Andre, Austin survived the Sharpshooter at WM 13. Hell, Jeff Hardy, Edge, Mick Foley, even the New Age Outlaws and Adrian Adonis have moments that you can clearly remember off the top of your head. The newer guys are so interchangeable and forgettable because they aren't that "charismatic" or exciting. And it takes more than knowing how to execute an enziguiri properly to be a good wrestler.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rico Len Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/August/2014 at 19:34
Originally posted by ihatethatmonkee ihatethatmonkee wrote:



Rodriguez had 14, and won 9, hardly anything to compare. Bautista is nothing compared to him, and to give that travesty of a "fight" any exposure would be a crime to the eyes of anything forced to view it.


Exactly Batista was nothing compared to ADR. You don't see any potential what-so-ever in ADR who was definitely the underdog in WWE terms bringing all this to light?


Originally posted by ihatethatmonkee ihatethatmonkee wrote:

he didn't need a feud with Dave at all, he needed to be consistently booked as a heel, and that never happened. there were flashes in the feud with Sheamus, but they then over complicated it.


Who's talking about NEED? I'm not. I'm just saying that their feud could easily have been a whole damned lot better than it was, and even though ADR was obviously going to put Bats over, after bringing up the huge gulf between their MMA records, ADR would have come off the better in the eyes of the IWC, and he kinda could have used their backing more than he got.

EDIT: I always liked ADR's cross armbreaker off the ropes. I know that wasn't a one off high spot, but when I think of why I liked him, that move in particular, along with how smoothly he could slap on the armbreaker in general stand out in my mind.

Edited by Rico Len - 09/August/2014 at 19:36
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ihatethatmonkee Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09/August/2014 at 19:36
true, he didn't have a sizzling move-set. not really being a high flyer, and definitely being a submission specialist though shouldn't have meant he couldn't have gotten far.

he did get moments of genuine heat, but nothing was done to genuinely further that. as far as cutting promos in Spanish, that would have been more of blurring the lines, hence my comparison to the Hart Foundation.

it's weird, as I am not his biggest fan by any stretch, but the more I looked into his time with WWE, the more it became obvious that his "pushes" weren't necessarily for his characters betterment, but to further push someone, or something, else.

Originally posted by Rico Len Rico Len wrote:

Originally posted by ihatethatmonkee ihatethatmonkee wrote:



Rodriguez had 14, and won 9, hardly anything to compare. Bautista is nothing compared to him, and to give that travesty of a "fight" any exposure would be a crime to the eyes of anything forced to view it.


Exactly Batista was nothing compared to ADR. You don't see any potential what-so-ever in ADR who was definitely the underdog in WWE terms bringing all this to light?


not as far as furthering a ADR/Bats feud, no.

and, as a heel, he would have no way of introducing anything from his life outside of WWE into his character. that only seemingly gets allowed to happen to gain respect from the crowd. as a heel, he didn't need respect. as a person though, he did, but not from the crowd, from the WWE higher ups.

Originally posted by Rico Len Rico Len wrote:

Originally posted by ihatethatmonkee ihatethatmonkee wrote:

he didn't need a feud with Dave at all, he needed to be consistently booked as a heel, and that never happened. there were flashes in the feud with Sheamus, but they then over complicated it.


Who's talking about NEED? I'm not. I'm just saying that their feud could easily have been a whole damned lot better than it was, and even though ADR was obviously going to put Bats over, after bringing up the huge gulf between their MMA records, ADR would have come off the better in the eyes of the IWC, and he kinda could have used their backing more than he got.


the backing of the IWC?

the same IWC who bitched and whined that Bryan needed to be main eventing, then when he headlined a PPV, they still weren't prepared to put their money where their mouths were, and immediately went back to bitching when WWE didn't stick with pushing him?

how would ADR have come out better off in that short programme? he losses to a guy who won his fight by TKO against a fat guy who, at moments, still looked like he could have ended the match against Dave.

Edited by ihatethatmonkee - 09/August/2014 at 19:43
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